Day #124 in lockdown Mumbai, India hotel…What is it really like?…Vultures?…

Classic scene of three vultures on a limb in Kruger National Park. We were thrilled to get this shot from quite a distance. From this site:  Vultures are, however, great ecologists, having a high sense of personal hygiene and are a manifestation of the adage of patience as a virtue. They clean the veld of carrion, thereby minimizing the impact of animal disease, and they bathe regularly in rivers after gorging themselves at a kill.”

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Today’s photos are from July 25, 2018, while in Marloth Park, South Africa. See the link here for more photos.



Now that I’m walking four miles a day (6.5 km) in the corridors, I’m left with plenty of time to think. Playing podcasts on my phone while walking helps create a diversion from over-thinking our current situation.

This appeared to be the most common vulture we spotted, the white-backed vulture. From
 this site: “To watch the interaction of vultures at a kill is like witnessing the unbridled nature of food politics. The Shangaan proverb that translates as ‘where the vultures assemble, there is a kill’ refers to the fact that when people gather together there is always a purpose in mind. The White-backed Vulture is the most common vulture in Kruger. There are approximately 2000 pairs in the Park, concentrated mostly in the dry, lightly wooded grasslands of the east and mopane veld of the north. They are the most gregarious of vultures, often roosting in large communes where they sleep with their heads tucked under their wings. They often soar at great heights during the day and depend on either the Bateleur or other vultures to lead them to a kill.”

Invariably, my over-active brain takes over to find myself in a loop of thoughts blurring any sounds emanating from my phone while my aching legs (due to cardiovascular disease) struggle to keep the pace and accomplish the goals I’ve set for myself. 


I’ve accepted the fact that the best remedy for my condition is walking as often and as much as I can throughout the day. During the opposite times, I’m firmly ensconced in my comfy chair in the hotel room with my laptop on a pillow on my lap.

This vulture appeared to be a different species from the others shown.

Upon arising each hour to walk, my legs feel stiff and almost immobile, but by the time I get my shoes, mask, and earbuds back on, I’m ready to go again and head out the door.


I check the Fitbit stats on my phone to ensure I manage sufficient steps each hour in order to reach my goal by the end of the day. I start at 8:00 and usually end by 3:00 or 4:00 pm.


Walking has been an enormous benefit to both of us, not only for the obvious health reasons, but also as a distraction during these long days and nights. It feels as if this intermittent walking has a greater benefit than if I struggled to accomplish this lofty goal in one fell swoop.

There was little information online to help us identify these vultures. From this site: Vultures fight unashamedly over whatever scraps they can get, and when they descend on the proverbial trough, their grim determination is evident – these birds can consume a kilogram of meat in a minute and strip a carcass within hours.”

Frequently, it’s necessary to maneuver around the cleaning carts, cleaners going in and out of rooms and vacuuming the corridors, and staff walking the halls to and from their various workstations. 


Currently, we are the only guests on this floor and undoubtedly, the longest staying guests in the hotel since the onset of the lockdown on March 24th, the day we arrived. 


By the time we leave here in the months to come, we may be the longest staying guests this hotel has ever hosted. As of July 28th, we’ll begin overstaying our visa, but we’ve attempted to do an extension several times without luck due to issues on their website.

This vulture appeared to be out of a scary movie or nightmare. From friend Ken (thanks, Ken!): This is the Hooded Vulture. They usually turn up on the feast after the Lappet-faced or white backed have torn into the carcass and had their fill. Details: 65 to 75cms high considered small in Vulture terms. The wingspan of 1.7 – 1.8m. From this site: Physically, all vultures appear built for scavenging. They have strong, hooked beaks that can tear a carcass open but unlike other birds of prey, their feet are not suited to catching live animals. The main exception appears to be the Hooded Vulture – as the smallest and most prone to being bullied off a carcass, it has diversified its diet to include termites and small animals such as lizards.”

We’re hoping the statement on their website will be adhered to, which we saved to our phones, stating there will be no issue if we leave within 30 days of the full re-opening of international flights at the Mumbai airport. That may not happen for many more months based on the increasing rates of the virus and resulting deaths.


I’d be going out of my mind with boredom by now if it weren’t for the walking. Since I don’t care to spend all day online, which works for Tom, I’d be climbing the walls as opposed to walking the halls during this extended period.

Obviously, there had been a kill in the area where we spotted these various vultures.

That’s what it’s really like. There’s an abundance of repetition; photos, words, walking, meals, conversations, news, questioning, searching, analyzing, speculating, and escaping into movies and TV series allowing us to stop our thoughts from “doing a number on us.” So far? So good.


Sorry for the redundancy. It’s not easy writing a story each day when there is no news!


Be well.

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Photo from one year ago today, July 26, 2019:

One year ago, while still recovering in Ireland, we hadn’t gone out for several days. Subsequently, we posted five-year-old photos from Madeira. For more details, please click here.

Vulture Day!…What?…Are vultures deserving a day of their own?…Most certainly!…

Classic scene of three vultures on a limb.  We were thrilled to get this shot from quite a distance.  From this site:  Vultures are, however, great ecologists, having a high sense of personal hygiene and are a manifestation of the adage of patience as a virtue. They clean the veld of carrion, thereby minimizing the impact of animal disease, and they bathe regularly in rivers after gorging themselves at a kill.”

“Sighting of the Day in the Bush”

Whoa, Mr. Zebra!  Why are you climbing the steps to the veranda?

Each visit to Kruger National Park seems to result in the focus of one particular species or another.  It may be rhinos, elephants, giraffe, zebras, or wildebeest. 

Oddly, and much to our surprise the focus of yesterday’s foray in the park seemed to highlight vultures. After about 45 minutes on the tar road from the Crocodile Bridge entrance, we noticed a number of vehicles tightly pulled into an overlook area.  Of course, we had to stop to see what was going on.

This appeared to be the most common vulture we spotted, the white-backed vulture. From
 this site: “To watch the interaction of vultures at a kill is like witnessing the unbridled nature of food politics. The Shangaan proverb that translates as ‘where the vultures assemble, there is a kill’ refers to the fact that when people gather together there is always a purpose in mind. The White-backed Vulture is the most common vulture in Kruger. There are approximately 2 000 pairs in the Park, concentrated mostly in the dry, lightly wooded grasslands of the east and mopane veld of the north. They are the most gregarious of vultures, often roosting in large communes where they sleep with their heads tucked under their wings. They often soar at great heights during the day and depend on either the Bateleur or other vultures to lead them to a kill.”

One’s hope in these situations that lions might be the reason for the gathering of vehicles.  For us, who have yet to see lions while driving through Kruger but have experienced several sightings from Marloth Park overlooking the Crocodile River from this side of the fence, we hoped it was lions.

Most photo safari participants, whether self-driven or in a guide-driven and assisted safari vehicle, long to see lions above all other wildlife in the massive national park.

This vulture appeared to be a different species from the others shown.

Months ago, we let go of our burning desire to see lions in Kruger National Park since we’d seen them on the river and we didn’t want our focus on lions to distract us from other wildlife we’ve thoroughly enjoyed sighting on our almost weekly visits to the park.

As we entered the tight overlook area, where no less than a dozen vehicles were crammed, we searched and searched for a lion, a kill, or a dying animal that may have attracted the many vultures in trees and hovering over the area, to no avail.

There was little information online to help us identify these vultures.  Any comments would be appreciated! From this site: Vultures fight unashamedly over whatever scraps they can get, and when they descend on the proverbial trough, their grim determination is evident – these birds can consume a kilogram of meat in a minute and strip a carcass within hours.”

Tom used his trusty Swarovski binoculars while I searched with the viewfinder of the camera scanning every inch of terrain which wasn’t obstructed by trees and bush.  No luck. We didn’t see a thing other than the variety of vultures we’ve presented here today, most of which were sitting in trees rather than eating something on the ground.

Although months ago we purchased the Kruger Park Map & Guide with photos of most birds found in the park included birds of prey, we weren’t able to identify by name any of the specific vultures shown above other than the white-backed vulture.  

This vulture appears to be out of a scary movie or nightmare. From friend Ken (thanks, Ken!): This is the Hooded Vulture. They usually turn up on the feast after the Lappet-faced or white backed has torn into the carcass and had their fill. Details: 65 to 75cms high considered small in Vulture terms. The wingspan of 1.7 -1.8m. From this site: Physically, all vultures appear built for scavenging. They have strong, hooked beaks that can tear a carcass open, but unlike other birds of prey, their feet are not suited to catching live animals. The main exception appears to be the Hooded Vulture – as the smallest and most prone to being bullied off a carcass, it has diversified its diet to include termites and small animals such as lizards.”

If any of our worldwide readers are vulture enthusiasts, please send me an email from the link on the right side of our homepage under the “translate” button and let me know each species numbered them top to bottom beginning with photo #1.  This would be greatly appreciated.

There’s no doubt, we often search for birds in our garden, throughout Marloth Park on our almost daily drives and when visiting Kruger.  However, we must admit, the bulk of acquired knowledge revolves around other types of wildlife.



Here in Africa, we love the sounds of a variety of birds pecking in our bird feeder, the constant “trilling” sound of the helmeted guinea fowls, the squawking of hornbills, and of course, any sightings of the most peculiar and fascinating ostriches. 


Obviously, there had been a kill in the area where sighting these various vultures.

While living in Kauai, Hawaii in 2015 for four months, we were literally obsessed with the nesting Laysan Albatross as shown in dozens of posts such as this one here.  Also, during the extended stay on the island, we fell in love with a singing-for-nuts, red cardinal we aptly named “Birdie” which can be found here.


Lately, our favorite birds have been francolins, Frank and the Mrs. who now respond when we call for them.  In the meantime, the not-so-dumb guinea fowls come running when they hear me call for Frank, knowing birdseed is on the horizon.


Then, of course, there were hundreds of thousands of birds we saw while in Antarctica, a mere six months ago.  See this link for some of those stunning birds, including albatross and a wide array of penguin species.

We got as close as possible but were unable to see what had piqued the interest of all of these vultures. From this site: “Almost all the vultures in Africa are represented in Kruger, the main exception being the Lammergeyer, which is restricted to the Kwazulu-Natal Drakensberg, and the Palm-nut Vulture, which is found on the eastern seaboard (rarely seen in Kruger). The Park has thus become a vulture sanctuary, mainly because of the predator activity on the ground, and secondly because of poisoning in non-protected areas of southern Africa.” 

We’re often dependent upon our friends Lynne and Mick from Marloth Park (now in the UK) and also friend Louise in Kauai, Hawaii to assist us in identifying birds but we don’t like to take up too much of their time.  If you can help, please do.

One thing for sure, wherever we may travel in the world, there are birds and we’ll always enjoy sightings with opportunities to take photos when possible to share with all of our readers/friends.

Thank you for being on this journey with us!  May your day provide you with opportunities to enjoy our flying, walking, and running aviary friends.

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Photo from one year ago today, July 25, 2017:

One year ago while in Las Vegas I dinged the rental car.  How I got it fixed was quite unusual. Click here for the details.

Part 2…Harrowing, exciting and frustrating day in Kruger National Park…A staple gun dictated “safari luck!”

This baby zebra leaned into mom as we stopped for a photo.  For all we knew, we could have been the first humans she’d ever seen.

“Sighting of the Day in the Bush”

Shortly after we returned several kudus stopped by to say hello.

In order to make heads or tails of today’s story, it is important to read yesterday’s post which may be found here.  Today’s post is obviously a continuation of our harrowing and yet exciting day in Kruger National Park and yesterday’s post explains the comment in the heading, “a staple gun dictated “safari luck…”

In one of yesterday’s closing paragraph’s we wrote: “But tomorrow, we’ll share the balance, a story of making mistakes, taking wrong roads and choosing a ridiculous shortcut that only cost us more time and frustration, all of which, we must admit, was softened by this scene of the elephants…”,

Zebras and baby wandering down the dirt road.

And mistakes we made that day one of which was venturing out on those awful dirt roads in a highly unsuitable little car which simply was designed to take the battering of the washboard roads, not unlike its passengers during the harrowing drive.

At several points on the dirt roads, we heard a rattling in the car, even at the low speeds we were traveling that sounded as if something was going to fall out or off of the car. 

A male zebra, posing for a photo.

We both stayed as calm as we could but were thinking the same thing…what if the older little car broke down and we were stranded on this remote road?  Yes, we had a SIM card in my phone which was almost fully charged (the phone charger outlet in the car doesn’t work).  And there was an emergency phone number we could have called in the back in the park’s map book.

But, the thought of sitting in a broken down rental car waiting to be rescued was not appealing to either of us.  Even while Tom slowed to a snail’s pace, the rattling continued.  So we continued on, stopping only when we finally made it to the gate after driving for hours, in order to travel the mere 60 km (37 miles) to reach the Malelane Gate. Turning in our paperwork and getting on a paved road couldn’t have been more of a relief.

After we spotted the elephants crossing the road after we’d decided to head to the Malelane Gate when the Crocodile Bridge was blocked for hours by a stuck boat trailer, we encountered this lone giraffe.

We’d never entered or exited Kruger at the Malelane Gate.  As a matter of fact, we hadn’t been to Malelane since our arrival in South Africa over five weeks ago.  Four years ago, we had a great dinner there while chickens wandered about the interior of the restaurant.  We remembered that about Malelane.  (See that link here from December 22, 2013)

Once outside the gate, we watched for roadsigns indicating how to return to Marloth.  We saw one sign that read Komatipoort and that seemed the right direction for us.  Somehow we missed the sign for N4.

A warthog family on the rough dirt road on the way to the Malelane Gate.

After the awful drive, we were exhausted and distracted.  Plus, there are very few road signs that point to Marloth Park.  Why we stayed on the main highway R570, we’ll never know, when in fact we needed N4.

We drove for over 32 km (20 miles) one way in error before we realized, in the pouring rain, that we didn’t recognize any of the names of upcoming towns such as Pig’s Peak and Jeppes Reef.  We’d driven almost all the way to Swaziland!  Now we had to backtrack the 32 km to return to Malelane to get to N4 and on to Marloth Park.

This warthog appears to have been rolling in mud as she hangs out with male impala.

Suddenly, it dawned on me that we did have a map in the glovebox.  For some reason, we thought we only had maps for Marloth Park and Kruger.  In checking out the map, we realized our error.  Oh, what a day!

We noticed on the map that we’d pass Hectorspruit, a small town between Malelane and Marloth.  Once on road heading back N4 we encountered a sign that indicated a road to Hectorspruit which was a shortcut, according to the map.  Big mistake!

The rough washboard road seemed as if it would never end. It took us hours to get out of the park.

If we thought the washboard dirt roads in Kruger were bad, we were in for a big surprise.  The road from R570 to Hectorspruit to N4 was by far, the worst paved road we’d ever driven on of all of the above. 

Talk about potholes!   There were deep potholes every meter (every few feet), many we couldn’t see until a tire dropped into one after another, with nowhere else on the road or the shoulder to drive and for us, after the harrowing day, no turning back.

More elephants spotted at quite a distance.  We continued on the road.

During that horrific half hour drive, we bounced, rattled and practically rolled in the pothole clusters that occupied the entire road.  Only our friends and readers in this area can grasp the severity of this road had they ever had the misfortune to travel on it.

Yes, we know, this is Africa and certainly, our comments aren’t tendered as complaints.  However, they are tendered as to our own failure to more diligently find our way back to Marloth Park.

A few more elephant photos we’d yet to share in yesterday’s post.

Finally, we reached N4 and easily found our way back to Marloth Park.  By the time we pulled into the driveway, it was almost 4:30 pm.  We’d yet to put a dent in the day’s post.  We still had to shower again and clean up to go out to Jabula for dinner as intended.

We decided to ditch our dinner plans, stay in and make bacon and eggs for dinner (nothing was defrosted) and spend the evening on the veranda.  At one point, the much-needed rain and wind drove us indoors. But a few hours later we had finished and uploaded the post, cooked our feeble dinner and were able to dine outdoors during the balance of the soaking rain.

We couldn’t believe how many there were, as many as 30 to 40.

 Whew!  We were grateful we’d seen the elephants crossing the road which most certainly softened the blow of the remainder of the day.  We’re curious as to when and how they got that boat and trailer stuck on the Crocodile Bridge moving again.  If you’ve heard anything, please let us know.

Last night in celebration of St. Patrick’s Day (Tom is Irish) we headed to Jabula for a very pleasant evening, running into friends, making new friends, enjoying the chatter with owner Dawn and helper Lynn, suddenly finding ourselves retelling this story, only to find locals practically rolling on the floor in laughter over our mishaps on the road.

A hornbill in a tree.  We spotted dozens of hornbills in Kruger.

We’re both easily able to laugh at ourselves, and laugh we did along with everyone else.  Could the hard parts of these scenarios have been prevented? 
Should we have waited at the Crocodile Bridge for what may have been hours in order to have been able to get through?  We’ll never know.

Should we have paid more attention to where we were in the rainstorm when we exited the Malelane Gate?  Sure. Should we have avoided the pothole detour and driven further back to Malelane to get to N4? Absolutely.

A lone male impala stares as we pass by.

So here’s our story folks.  Today at 2:00, we’ll visit the home of locals we’ve met that have quite a story to share which we’ll be posting here in a few days.
Tonight, on this perfect weather day, we’re making pizza and look forward to dining on the veranda while we wait for visitors to stop by.

Happy day!

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Photo from one year ago today, March 18, 2017:

Visitors sitting on the steps of the Sydney Opera House enjoying the view.  We had taken the Manly Ferry to come see the opera we’d booked but arrived one day too early. AT that point we were preoccupied with our illegal immigrant status possibly attributing to the error. Thank goodness it wasn’t one day too late.  For details, please click here.

Part 1…Harrowing, exciting and frustrating day in Kruger National Park…A staple gun dictated “safari luck!”


Upon approaching this scene we weren’t quite certain what was going on.

“Sighting of the Day in the Bush”

Vultures in a tree in Kruger on the lookout for a meal.

Vultures relaxing after a meal in Kruger.
After working on yesterday’s post for only a short while and, with the sun shining on a cooler day, we said, “What the heck! Let’s head out to Kruger for a few hours and see what we can find! We’ll finish the post when we return by 1:00 pm or so.”
By 10:00 am we were on the road. On our past entries into Kruger, we found two to three hours was plenty of time to see some wildlife, take photos and return back to our entrance point, known as the Crocodile Bridge Gate.

Upon closer inspection it was apparent, the boat trailer couldn’t fit across the Crocodile Bridge, our means of exit after a day in the park.

There are nine entrance gates to Kruger, each of which is many kilometers from one another.  If one enters in one location, unless they have plans for another area, generally they exit from the same gates. 

However, like us four years ago, on our way to the Blyde River Canyon, we exited from a gate considerably further north than our entrance point at the Crocodile River which is close to Marloth Park. 

Lots of lookie-loos stopped to view and comment on the situation.  There was no way anyone was getting in our out of Kruger via this bridge based on this scenario.

It takes approximately eight minutes from Marloth Park, based on our current location and another 12 minutes to reach the Crocodile River gate.  This 20-minute drive seems to pass quickly while we chatter with enthusiasm over entering Kruger once again.

Since we recently purchased an annual pass, that pays for itself after six uses, we have no doubt, it will have been a worthwhile purchase during our remaining 12 months (off and on) in Marloth Park.

This was the first of over 30 elephants we watched cross the road.  In the distance, difficult to see was the most enormous matriarch we’d ever seen.  Had we been 10 minutes earlier, we may have seen her. 

Why would we go to Kruger as opposed to staying in Marloth Park when we have so much wildlife right before our eyes?  If you’re one of our many newer readers, we’ll explain.  In Marloth, generally, we don’t have the big five; elephant, lion, cape buffalo, leopard and rhino.

Had we been 10 minutes later, we’d have missed the entire parade of elephants crossing the road.

However, from time to time, lions enter Marloth Park as they have most recently so all residents must keep an eye and ear out to ensure their safety.  There’s always been a ban on walking in Marloth after dark which is of particular importance right now. 
There were numerous babies of varying ages in the “parade” of elephants.  We were so close, little to no zoom was required to capture these photos.

Based on the lion attack story we posted this past week on March 11th, about Jonas who was attacked by such a lion years ago, one can never be too cautious.  Click here if you missed that post.

By 10:20 we presented our “documents” at the Crocodile entrance gate and after the usual five minute processing time including inspecting the trunk for guns, alcohol or harmful substances, the bar was lifted and we gained access to the park.

At first, we thought there may be a dozen but they kept coming and coming.

There are many options of which roads one can choose in the park but there are only a few paved roads, which to complete in a full circle may require a full day of driving to end up back at the entrance.  As a result, we like many others, choose to embark upon some of the bumpy dirt roads.

Is the viewing better on the dirt roads?  Not necessarily.  The wildlife may be close to the paved road or any of the myriad bumpy dirt roads.  It’s not as if the animals prefer one road or another, when often they are on the roads for only a short period of time, preferring to head back into the bush for food, shelter and for safety.

Only one other car enjoyed the experience with us.  We were on a very bumpy dirt road many visitors to the park may have avoided.

By about noon, after we’d seen only a bit of wildlife, mostly impala, of which we have many in Marloth Park, we felt that our usual “safari luck” may not present and for once, we were about to experience less than a successful day.  We accepted this fact, acknowledging that sooner or later such a day would occur.

With a map in hand, we planned our route to make a full circle leading us back to the Crocodile Bridge gate with a plan to get back “home” in plenty of time to complete the day’s post, and head to Jabula in time for happy hour and dinner. 

We practically held our breath as they made their way across the dirt road.

Little did we know what lies ahead.  First off, the bumpy dirt road we’d chosen for the route was in poor shape with what Tom referred to as a “washboard” surface.  Oh, good grief!  It was bumpy indeed.

The little car rattled more than I’d ever heard a car rattle, at a few points, even amid Tom’s careful driving, sounded as it was ready to fall apart and leave itself on the road in a pile of cheap metal. 

This elephant to the left turned to look at us, wondering if we were a threat.  We were prepared to back up at any moment.

The fact we hadn’t seen much in the way of wildlife to fuel our enthusiasm, the car’s five-speed transmission, coupled with the outrageous road made for one unpleasant drive.  But, oh, this wasn’t the worst of it.  Wait, more is yet to come.

Finally, once we exited the gate and neared the bridge, we couldn’t believe the scene before our eyes.  The one-way narrow bridge was totally blocked by a car hauling a boat and trailer became stuck between the low support posts, intended to keep vehicles from driving off the bridge into the dangerous Crocodile River (hence, it’s name).  The trailer’s wheels were wider than the bridge itself.

After several had passed, she turned to look at us directly.  Had she started moving toward us, we’d have high-tailed out of there.  Elephants have been known to topple over cars, crushing them in the process.

When we arrived at the scene we were one of maybe three vehicles hoping to cross.  Within about 10 minutes, there were 12 to 15 vehicles lined up with drivers and passengers getting out to check out the situation and perhaps, offer their two-cents worth of advice, none of which would be effective without some major equipment coming to the scene.

We waited, waited and waited.  There was no way any of us would be getting across this bridge in anytime soon.  We had a decision to make…sit here and wait for what certainly would be hours or attempt to get out of the park via another route, the closest gate being Malelane Gate, 60 kilometers (37 miles) from our current location. 

She kept watch as more came across the road.

On the slow unpaved roads, we expected the drive would take an extra 90 minutes.  Plus, when we exited through the Malelane Gate, we’d have another 49 kilometers (30.5 miles) to return to Marloth Park.  Most likely we’d be back at our place by 2:00 pm or so.  We decided to leave rather than sit for hours at the blocked Crocodile Bridge.

Then, of course, we had to regain entrance into the park.  The person handling documents didn’t speak English well and had trouble understanding why we needed to get back into the park in order to exit via Malelane. 

Although not the matriarch she may have been second-in-command.  When she saw this tiny elephant and another baby crossing she focused even more.

Finally, the gate agent figured it out and he dug out our original documents but needed to staple the paperwork together. There were no staples in his staple gun, nor in the next booth, nor in the next booth and after about five or six minutes, he rousted up some staples. It was this delay…staples…that influenced an upcoming next experience.

Little did we know or anticipate that the dirt roads we had to take to get to the Malelane Gate were considerably worse than the bumpy dirt roads we’d experienced earlier.  I can honestly say, we’ve never traveled on “washboard” road to this extent.  If I thought the car was falling apart earlier, this was twice as bad.  We couldn’t wait for the long ride to end.

Once she saw they were safe she backed off, joining the others on the left side of the road.  We’d practically held our breath during the entire crossing, thrilled and excited for the experience.

But then…amid our frustration (no, Tom didn’t get overly grumpy but then, I wasn’t necessarily “overly bubbly” although we both were staying on an even keel), safari luck kicked in and before our eyes, a scene we’d experienced four years ago and had dreamed of seeing once again, lie before our eyes…the dozens of elephants crossing the road as shown in today’s photos.

Had it not been for the delay in finding the staples, we would have missed it.  We couldn’t stop smiling while rapidly taking photos as we watched this magical scene transpire before us.  Of course, the first thing we said, “Safari luck rewarded us for the harrowing drive and the delays at the Crocodile Bridge.”

Mom and baby wildebeest walking along the road.

The story doesn’t end here.  But tomorrow, we’ll share the balance, a story of making mistakes, taking wrong roads and choosing a ridiculous shortcut that only cost us more time and frustration, all of which, we must admit, was softened by this scene of the elephants, all due to a staple gun’s missing staples. 

We never made it to Jabula for dinner last night.  We’ll go tonight instead.  After all, I’m married to an Irishman and today is St. Patrick’s Day (also son Richard‘s birthday.  Happy b’day Richard!) and surely we’ll have some fun at Jabula tonight!

Happy St. Patrick’s Day to all who celebrate and be safe in the process!

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Photo from one year ago today, March 17, 2017:
This cockatoo stopped by for a visit, alighting atop Bob’s medicinal Papaw tree in the yard.  For more photos, please click here.