Day #121 in lockdown Mumbai, India hotel…Recalling the morphology of the banana tree…A fascinating process..

This was our first photo taken over two months ago on our first walk up the steep hill. We were fascinated by this peculiar looking pod which is called the inflorescence.

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Today’s photos are from July 22, 2014, while in Campanario, Madeira, Portugal. See the link here for more photos.


After more research, we discovered the following statement on India’s visa site as follows:

Vide MHA O.M. No. 25022/24/2020-F.V/F.I(Pt.) dated 29.06.2020. In respect of foreign nationals, whose Regular Visa or e-Visa or stay stipulation period is expiring post 30.06.2020, such Regular Visa or e-Visa or stay stipulation period shall be deemed to be valid until 30 more days from the date of resumption of normal international flight operations on ‘GRATIS’ basis without levy of overstay penalty.”

The “inflorescence” continued to grow, changing before our eyes.
We took a photo of this statement on my phone and will present it at the airport if any issues arise when we attempt to leave the country, sometime within the 30-day period after normal international flight operations resume in India. In other words, we need to hightail it out of India within that period.

That will give us enough time to decide which will be the best country to visit that will allow us to enter and stay for 90-days or more. With COVID-19, we prefer to fly to as few airports as possible during the journey, wherever that may be.
“The inflorescence is a complex structure that includes the flowers that will develop into fruits.” The hanging pink and yellowish protrusions are the flowers. Mother Nature is amazing!
For now, we sit back and wait for the 30-day ticker to begin when India opens its airports to normal international operations. We are fine with this prospect, feeling confident we’ll find a country to accept us somewhere in the world.



We’re back to our former status quo of watching news reports, the stats in India, and other countries, all the while wondering when the international airport will resume operations.

As days turned into weeks, the inflorescence changed dramatically.

Not much new is transpiring right now. My sister Susan, in hospice care in Las Vegas, Nevada, is in stable condition at the moment. I’ve been able to have a few good conversations with her when she seemed clearer and more lucid. I usually call her after 10:00 pm here when it’s morning in Nevada, a time which seems better for her than in the evening.


The 12½ hour time difference makes it tricky to reach family members at suitable times of the day or night. When I call at night, I miss my “sleepiness” signal at around 10:30 pm and end up having an awful time falling asleep after an emotional and stimulating conversation. 

One morning I noticed that the stalk, the rachis, had dropped partially out of view behind withering leaves.

After talking to Julie last night, I never fell asleep until after 1:00 am. Recently, I’ve started the equivalent of counting sheep, counting backward from 100. I may start over two or three times when I get down to 80, but this seems to calm down my over-active brain.


Today’s photos are from this date in 2014 while we were living on the island of Madeira in 2014. I should mention, I keep jumping back and forth to different countries and time periods, based on the quality of photos from “this date” so many years ago. 

After a few weeks of rain when we didn’t walk the hills, this small bunch of banana appeared as nourished from the remainder of the plant and its amazing elements. It’s easy to revel in how complex and interesting Life is all around us.

While in Madeira on this date, we’d shared photos taken over a period of two months on the “morphology” of the banana plant as we walked each day in the neighborhood on the steep hills in Campanario, to observe a particular plant. It was fascinating to watch the evolution of the plant to finally end a big beautiful bunch of bananas.


Here’s a link with a scientific description of the morphology of the banana plant which we found interesting. In our world travels, we search for any forms of life that appeal to our senses whether animal, vegetation, scenery, or culture.


Hope you enjoy these repeated photos from 2014 and perhaps think about it next time you peel and eat a banana.


Happy day!

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Photo from one year ago today, July 22, 2019:

A sailing regatta near Roundstone at dusk in Connemara, Ireland. For more photos, please click here.