A repost from five years ago that still reflects our views…

Our new friend, “One-Wart,” is missing a full-sized wart on the right side of his face. Most likely, he was “born this way.,” possibly due to inbreeding. We have no doubt, he’ll be a regular.

While I’ve continued to edit past posts due to errors I’ve made over the years, along with other errors as a result of WiFi issues at the time, I stumbled across a post from November 13, 2015, that over five years later, still resonates who we are and what we believe. I hesitated to repost the text, of course, using some new photos from Marloth Park.

Why the hesitation? To avoid redundancy. After all, during the past 10 months in lockdown in India, there certainly was plenty of redundancy with dull stories and repeated photos from years past when no new photos were being taken. Thus, if you recall this post, feel free to pass by the text and enjoy the new photos taken in the past 24 hours.

Impalas rarely come to the garden since they are extremely shy around humans. This fellow stops by almost daily.

If years ago, someone would have told me I had to write a new story 365 days a year for over eight years, relevant to the current times, I’d have laughed and said it was impossible. I’d never be motivated to perform such a task. And yet, here we are, plugging away with the same enthusiasm in preparing our first post published on March 15, 2012. See that post here. It didn’t include a single photo but over the years, that first post has been one of our favorites, so well describing who we are and what we hoped to achieve in our worldwide travels.

But, this post, I stumbled upon yesterday afternoon while working on the past post’s edits, also caught my eye and I decided to share it again with you today. Our long time readers may recall this post, or they may not. Our newer readers may never have come across it as they occasionally reviewed the archives, if at all.

This is Dad & Son, who stop by daily to see what’s on the menu.

In essence, this old post is no big deal, but it is a reflection of who we were then and who we are now, which only you, as readers may decide if we have changed our views over the years. To see the photos from that date, please click here. Sit back, relax and read this revealing personal exposé we took seriously at the time and do so again now.  Here we go:

“A grain of sand on the beach of life…Who are we?…

Nothing in life is static. No state of being is guaranteed. All we know for certain is tomorrow a new day will dawn and tonight a sun will set. Even that eventuality is in question by scientific predictions in the millennium to come or sooner.

When we hear of new planets emerging within our range of perspective at the edges of our universe, our earth becomes small and insignificant in the vast expanse of “forever,” a place none of us in this lifetime will ever know.

How do we grasp a news report such as this:

“A rocky Earth-sized planet that circles a small, nearby star could be the most important world ever found beyond the solar system, astronomers say.The planet lies in the constellation of Vela in the southern sky and is close enough for telescopes to observe any atmosphere, it has, a procedure that could help spot life on other planets in the future. Named GJ 1132b, the alien world is about 16% larger than Earth, and at 39 light-years distant, is three times closer than any other Earth-sized rocky planet yet found around another star. At that distance, it is hoped that telescopes will be able to make out the chemistry of its atmosphere, the speed of its winds, and the colors of its sunsets.”

Six warthogs, a kudu and Frank came by, gathering around the braai.

As we simpletons scour the world, the earth, enraptured by its endless wonders along the way, we are in awe of earth’s natural evolution leaving some of the most exquisite scenery in its wake. Imagine all the millions of years that no humans were on this earth to even know it was there.

With predictions that human life as we know it, from a scientific perspective, has populated the earth for a mere 200,000 years is a “drop in the bucket” in time, a single grain of sand on a beach.

As the earth has further populated, each one of us has become a grain of sand on another beach of impossible calculations. How many are there now? How many have there been and how many are there yet to come?

A male bushbuck and a male impala. This species often graze together without incident.

And, within our own limited field of vision, we deem ourselves significant and meaningful. Collectively, we matter. Individually, we must seek the power of the masses to hope for change and progression.

It’s easy to hide away in our own self imposed universe, in our geographic sphere, reaching out only to that which is readily available within our grasp. Is it human nature that we tend to cocoon in a limited space and time?

Oh, as I ponder these thoughts, as I write a meaningless timeline of a day in the village as in yesterday’s post, I’m reminded of how infinitesimal our own world becomes coupled with our ambitious desire to see as much as the world as we can as the clock ticks loudly and annoyingly. How much time do we really have to complete this journey?  And what, within this realm, are we really doing?

After finishing the raw scramble eggs Tom placed in this pan, these two were determined to lap up every last drop.

I don’t know the answer to either of these questions which in itself is a further reminder of how little power we each have in this world. The mystery.  Is it wrought from a sense of spirituality or simply hard facts? It remains to be seen in this lifetime.

As we continue to explore the significance of every creature on earth and its interrelated purpose, it’s  easy to assume we humans are at the head of the food chain, and yet, life emerged long before we were here.

The cycle of life and the food chain is magical. Every creature’s design is magical and none of this could happen from an explosion of planets, remnants evolving into planets, remnants evolving into the earth.

Ms. Tortoise made a quick appearance, moving quickly through the bush.

A power, a spirituality beyond our comprehension created this magical life on this planet, and as we travel, we witness the vast array in which each population has formed their own perception of “who” and “what” this may be. They call it religion, faith, and spirituality in a manner they can most easily grasp and incorporate into their beings.

We don’t choose to see ourselves as self-serving individuals lost in a sea of “vacation,” “holiday” and travel options. We see ourselves, all of us, you and us, as on a long journey of personal discovery in pursuit of the answers to our own relevant questions, whether we travel the world or sit back in an armchair, hoping to find answers, if not in this lifetime but perhaps in the next.”

She cracked open the egg by pounding it on the cement, sucking out the contents. Animals using tools, fascinating!

This morning upon arising no less than 10 helmeted guinea-fowl were on the veranda hoping for seeds and once they left, francolins, Frank and The Misses were looking in the glass of the veranda’s sliding door  wondering when we’d be coming out to toss some bird seeds. It took us no time at all.

Life is good. We have WiFi, power, the high today will only be 92F, 33C, as we wait in anticipation of who may come to call in the next 12 hours, as we embrace our surroundings in the bush.

Be well.

Photo from one year ago today, January 30,2020:

Five years ago in 2016, we spent three months in New Plymouth, New Zealand living on an alpaca farm. In the early evening, a group of the babies got together to play, running through the paddock, making us laugh over their playful antics. For the year-ago post, please click here.

Ten species visited us in one day…Check out who came to call….

These two zebra boys have now figured out it’s worth visiting us for some treats.  We can hear the sounds of their hooves coming from the bush.  They don’t like sharing with “Little Wart Face” (shown in the background) and can get very pushy with him and with Frank.

“Sighting of the Day in the Bush”

A single damaged feather from a guinea fowl I found on the ground.

The majority of the holidaymakers have left Marloth Park, returning to their homes in South Africa and many other parts of the world.  Often, visitors come to Marloth Park for a mere three to five days.  We can’t imagine how in that short period they can reap the benefits of being in this wonderland.



In three to five days, during the busy holiday season, wildlife may rarely wander into their yard or be seen on the roads.  They could literally come here and only see a few impalas, hornbills and perhaps a kudu or two.
Male impalas showed up which we don’t often see in the yard.
But, nothing compares to the activity residents of the park are experiencing now that the bulk of the tourists have left.  Although this could be disputed and, I assure you it’s a topic of conversation in the bush that wildlife may not wander into the yards of bush houses, when so many humans are around.


Some tourists come to relax and unwind in this calming environment, staying up late on the verandas of their holiday homes, talking loudly, playing loud music and drinking alcohol in excess.  This type of noise is not appealing to the wild animals. 
A forkl of kudus and a herd of impalas.
Other tourists come here to utilize whatever time they may available to glean morsels of heaven found in this veritable paradise for animal lovers, sadly going away with having seen very little.


Even trips into Kruger, as we so well know, can be disappointing.  There’s no guaranty one will see more than impalas and birds in a single day’s visit.  Now that things have settled down here, this week we plan to go back to Kruger to see what we can find.
Several handsome impalas stopped by which we seldom see in our yard.  More often we see them on the sides of the road when driving through the park.
However, there’s no shortage of guaranteed entertainment right here on the veranda in the “Orange…More Than Just a Color” house we’ve rented for an extended period. If South Africa immigration allows, we’ll spend a year here until next February or March.


With the crowds thinned out and perhaps only 700 or so people living in the park right now, the wildlife is literally “pounding at our door” all day and evening.  At times, we can barely keep up feeding them pellets, carrots, apples and any raw vegetable scraps from our daily food prep.
Many helmeted guineafowls have become regular visitors.
Yesterday, in one single day, we had 10 different species visit us, some multiple times, some in different groups as appropriately named in our above photos.  As I busily prepared the food for Louise and Danie joining us for dinner,  I frequently stopped what I was doing to cut up apples and carrots for our animal friends.
We couldn’t believe our day when we had the following wildlife visit us in one day:
1.  Kudu
2.  Bushbuck
3.  Impala
4.  Warthog
5.  Mongoose
6.  Francolin
7.  Helmeted Guineafowl
8.  Zebra
9.  Duiker
10.Bushbabies
Frank our resident francolin doesn’t miss a thing!  Sometimes, he brings his girlfriend but most often he’s alone hanging out with the other animals,  Francolins are territorial and he won’t hesitate to attempt to scare off a warthog or kudu.
The most we’d ever counted, including when we were here four years ago was a total of eight.  Of course, we didn’t include the dozens of birds that flew into the yard throughout the day.  We love all of the birds but mention the guineafowl and Frank (francolin) since they rarely fly, spending their days walking about the bush and our yard.


Last night’s dinner was a big hit.  How could it not be when we were with Louise and Danie?  We so enjoy time spent together and never hesitate to arrange another excellent day or evening in each other’s company.
A band of mongoose comes by almost daily.  We feed them water mixed with raw scrambled eggs  Most likely, due to their presence, we won’t see too many snakes around here. 
The previous night, Sunday, we had a fabulous dinner and evening at Sandra and Paul’s home two doors down the road from us.  The food was superb and the companionship delightful. 


Whew!  Our social life is astounding!  But, as typical here in the park, people come and go.  Our friends Kathy and Don are gone now but should be returning in a few weeks.  Ken and Linda are traveling and should be returning in a few months.  Lynne and Mick won’t return until November.  Janet and Steve have company from the UK but we plan to see them soon.
And…here’s our girls…kudus, of course.
Even Louise and Danie will be gone for a week to visit family in Cape Town beginning on Friday.  But, they’ll be back to continue to handle their very active holiday home rental and house building businesses.  We’ll look forward to their return. 
Each night we put out the little cup of peach flavored yogurt on the stand and the bushbabies appear around 6:15 pm, just after darkness falls.
This doesn’t include all the other fine people we’ve met here who are permanent residents all of whom we look forward to spending time with again soon.  We can’t thank everyone enough to show our appreciation for including us in their busy lives. 


Where in the world is it like this?  The only other place we’ve found so easy to make friends was in Kauai, Hawaii.  Perhaps, someday we’ll return for another visit.
Duikers are extremely shy and seldom come near.
For now, we’re looking at our upcoming itinerary and any modifications we are considering.  Today, we’ll be doing some planning and figuring seeing what are our best options for the future.


Have a great day enjoying your best options.  Back at you soon! 
 ___________________________________


Photo from one year ago today, April 10, 2017:


This was a tile roof we spotted in Fairlight, Australia, one year ago.  For more photos, please click here.